Taxing, Briefly
Charitable Issues

Charitable Contributions – Part Two: Other Considerations

In our previous post, we took a high level look at charitable contributions and deductions, including looking at what made an organization “qualified” to receive charitable contributions, when deductions might be limited, and special rules for valuing and reporting non-cash charitable contributions. In this post, we will dig a little bit deeper and look at some issues that might affect the deductibility of a contribution. The Green Settee As we discussed in the first article,

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Taxing, Briefly
Charitable Issues

Charitable Contributions – Part One: Basic Concepts for Charitable Deductions

Your grandmother Phyllis was a remarkable woman. Aside from making it out on the other side of Uncle Bill’s childhood with only moderate shell shock (which, I suppose, is referred to these days as PTSD), Phyllis was an intelligence agent in the United States Army towards the end of World War II, and you could remember her saying that, despite as “intelligent” as she may have been in the Army’s estimation, her good genes weren’t

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Taxing, Briefly
Taxing, Briefly

Taxing, Briefly – Can the IRS Take My Passport?

When my son was two, his grandmother gave him a stuffed owl. Not a particularly creative toddler, he named the little owl Stuffy, and the name has stuck to this day. He took the owl everywhere, which naturally led to many a calamity when Stuffy was inevitably misplaced. For my wife and I, Stuffy also had an unintended consequence—leverage. The boy-child needed Stuffy to go to sleep. So, when he was being unabashedly insolent, the

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Taxing, Briefly
Taxing, Briefly

Taxing, Briefly: Will the IRS Take My House?

I met a new client about a month ago.  I was excited. It was the first in-person meeting I’d had for over a year due to COVID.  The client had settled a lawsuit, and the settlement income—though taxable—had been reported incorrectly on her Form 1099-MISC, so that the IRS got it into its administrative head that it was subject to self-employment income. It wasn’t. The client’s total liability would have been about $10,000, which was

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Taxing, Briefly
Taxing, Briefly

Taxing, Briefly: The IRS Collection Process

The Basic Principles of Collection In our previous post, we discussed how audits are performed and your available options throughout the examination process.  Once the audit is complete, and all administrative and legal remedies are exhausted, how does the IRS actually collect taxes?  The first step in the IRS collection process is assessment. The IRS cannot collect a tax until it has assessed it. There are a bevy of rules surrounding assessments.  In general, the

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Taxing, Briefly
Taxing, Briefly

Taxing, Briefly: The IRS Examination Process

Like Ten Thousand Spoons When All You Need is a Knife Do you feel like you are cursed to forever draw the short straw in life? Is Alanis Morrisette’s Ironic more of a personal anthem than an indictment of the Canadian educational system’s failure to properly differentiate between irony and unfortunate occurrences? In this post, we will assume that, in addition to the black fly in your chardonnay, you were greeted with a care package

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Taxing, Briefly
Taxing, Briefly

Taxing, Briefly: Taxing Social Media Influencers

Harsh Truths Taxing social media influencers? Way harsh, we know. Influencers have it tough anyhow, what with having to photograph everything they eat, or wear, or sneeze on.  Nevertheless, your fearless editors at Briefly Taxing thought it prudent to discuss some harsh truths about getting your money for nothing (and your “gifts” for free)—just in case you were thinking about getting into the social media influencing gambit.  In this post, we won’t cast aspersions against

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The Truth about Amending Tax Returns

Clients are untrustworthy.  As a tax controversy attorney, this is my experience. I have heard that other types of law deals with more honorable sorts, but I’ll believe it when I see it.  When a client comes to you and says “whoopsie, I forgot to report [insert absurdly large number

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Mathews v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-85)

On July 8, 2021, the Tax Court issued a Memorandum Opinion in the case of Mathews v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-85). The primary issue presented in Mathews was whether the Tax Court had jurisdiction to hear a petitioner when the pro se petitioner filed his petition (sent a letter to

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Delgado v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-84)

On July 7, 2021, the Tax Court issued a Memorandum Opinion in the case of Delgado v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-84). The primary issue presented in Delgado was whether the petitioner’s frivolous argument that he did not receive taxable income in 2017 because he was not engaged in a “trade

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Peterfreund v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-83)

On July 7, 2021, the Tax Court issued a Memorandum Opinion in the case of Peterfreund v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-83). The primary issue presented in Peterfreund was whether the IRS’s Whistleblower Office (WBO) abused its discretion because it did not initiate an administrative or judicial action and it did

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Pragias v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-82)

On June 30, 2021, the Tax Court issued a Memorandum Opinion in the case of Pragias v. Commissioner (T.C. Memo. 2021-82). The primary issue presented in Pragias was whether the six-year statute of limitations under IRC § 6501(e) (substantial omission of items) applied. The Substantial Omission Extension under IRC §

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